Real Clear Energy Charticles

Energy Charts Interpretated and Analyzed by RCEnergy

American Oil Production Grew Fastest in History

This chart shows that American oil production grew at the fastest rate in history over the past three years - about 1 million barrels per day. It also suggests why we ended up in an oil price collapse – oil production just grew too fast. So is it likely that production will increase by another 1 million barrels a day this year? Not at all. Still, the increases of the last three years...

Solar and Natural Gas Top 2014 Grid Additions

Natural gas and solar were the leading additions to the nation’s electrical grid in 2014. Wind was in third place. Gas tapered off slightly from 46 to 42 percent and solar rose from 29 to 32 percent. Wind took a big jump to 23 percent after falling from 41 to 7 percent in 2013. Remember, all these figures are percentages and do not reflect the absolute numbers. There were fewer...

Ethanol Exports Back to 2nd Highest Level Ever

U.S. ethanol exports climbed back to their second highest level in history last year. 2011 still remains the biggest year ever for ethanol exports. Canada, Brazil, the United Arab Emirates and the Phillipines remained the prime targets. All these countries will be using it as an octane booster for gasoline fuel. Canada and Brazil also have quotas for using ethanol in gasoline. The total was...

New England Tops Regional Electricity Prices

Except for the non-contiguous Pacific states (Alaska and Hawaii), New England tops the rest of the country in electrical prices. New Englanders pay 16.22 cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh) as opposed to a national average of 12.12 per kWh. Alaska and Hawaii pay 28.50 cents/kWh but they are exceptional in that their fuel has to be transported over great distances. New England has driven up its...

States With Lowest Electric Prices

Yesterday we featured the ten states with the highest electricity prices. Today we have the ten states with the lowest. The Pacific Northwest, Washington and Oregon, dominate while the rest of the states are in the southeast and the middle of the country. Most of these states rely on coal and nuclear with a smattering of hydro here and there. The Tennessee Valley Authority has a lot to do with...

New England and Northeast Pay Highest Electrical Prices

Hawaii, New York and Alaska lead the nation in the price of electricity but New England dominates the entire upper echelon. Hawaii and Alaska are expensive, of course, because they are remote and need to import almost everything. Hawaii, for example, must get all its coal and natural gas by tanker. New York is expensive because everything in New York is expensive – high taxes. But the...

Wind and Solar Now Top Subsidies

Solar subsidies have increased markedly since 2010 so that they are now the second most common form of subsidies. Wind was third with $5.5 billion in 2010 but has since moved to the top with $6 billion. The figures compiled by Watchdog.org show the amount of government subsidies for all the major fuels in 2010 and 2013. Fossil fuels now rank third but have declined somewhat. Conservation and...

Crude Inventories Provide Most Days' Supply Since 1985

The production of oil from fracking tight formations has produced the biggest day’s supply of crude oil since the glut of 1985. The day’s supply is calculated by dividing the supply of crude by the oil refineries’ throughput. So slowing activity at refineries can drive up the day’s supply figure as well. Crude inventories are piling up although, as Tuesday’s...

GHG Output of Various Oil Fields in Burning and Transport

The above chart prepared by Climate Central shows the greenhouse gas emissions of 30 major oil fields around the world, both for combustion and for transportation. As can be seen, oil from these fields differs very little except for three fields – two in Canada and one in Venezuela – which produce over 500 kg per barrel of oil as opposed to an average of about 450 kg/bbl for all the...

Nuclear and Coal Are Cheap - Not Counting Construction Costs

The World Economic Forum present the above graph as proof that nuclear and coal remain the cheapest ways of producing electricity. But the graph only includes PRODUCTION costs, meaning operating and maintenance and fuel costs. In this way, oil is by far the most expensive because of oil’s traditionally high price. But once construction costs are added in, nuclear becomes expensive on a...

Recent Charticles

Real Clear Energy Videos

Real Clear Energy Archives